Q & A with BeetBoost

There are so many products out on the market, which makes it hard to know what products are worth taking and what products are truly beneficial. When it comes to boosting exercise capacity and combating inflammation - beets and tart cherries have been linked to helping the body. Check out this Q & A with BeetBoost, a unique product that combines the benefits of beets and tart cherries in one product. Also see below a special discount code for the product for Fuel2Win!!


Q: What is unique about BeetBoost?
Beet Boost is the first product of its kind to combine the benefits of high nitrate beet juice with concentrated, tart cherry extract rich in anthocyanins. The synergy of these two ingredients provides athletes with greater impact on performance than each ingredient alone. Beet Boost is also unique in that it contains no added sugars, flavors, or synthetic ingredients. 


Q: What does research show that athletes can benefit from having tart cherries and beets?
Research shows that beet juice reduces oxygen cost which in turn enhances exercise capacity. This means athletes using Beet Boost can workout longer and stronger. Our beets promote vasodilation, increase blood flow, and boost oxygen availability to the brain allowing athletes to maintain mental clarity and quick reaction time during exercise. Science has demonstrated the benefits of tart cherry juice in accelerating recovery by reducing inflammation. Athletes who use tart cherry juice have decreased muscle pain after exercise, making it possible for them to exercise hard the next day. 


Q: Is there any benefit for non-athletes to take this product?
Yes! Beet Boost provides benefits for anyone looking to improve their health. Beet juice is shown to lower blood pressure and improve cardiovascular health. Tart cherry juice reduces inflammation and pain associated with joint and muscle soreness. Each serving provides the nutrients equivalent to eating 4 beets and 40 tart cherries! 


Q: Will an athlete 'feel' the product working?
The best way for an athlete to test the effects of Beet Boost is to drink a serving 30-60 minutes prior to exercise for 3 days. Take 2 days off, then resume using Beet Boost. Trialing the product in this way allows athletes to really notice the impact of Beet Boost.


Q: What are some ways you can recommend someone to use this product?
Beet Boost easily mixes with water and is intended to be used 30-60 minutes before exercise for maximum benefit. It pairs great with apple, orange, or other juices and can also be added to pre-workout smoothies or taken after exercise to maximize recovery. For overall health benefits, use Beet Boost daily either on its own or mixed into food.  

Check this product out: www.nutrigardens.com and enter code "fuel15" to save on your order! 

Q & A with Max McCormick

Max McCormick member of the Ottawa Senators  Max also runs McCormick Hockey School in the summers, for more information:  http://mccormickhockeyschool.com/

Max McCormick member of the Ottawa Senators  Max also runs McCormick Hockey School in the summers, for more information: http://mccormickhockeyschool.com/

Q1: What is one piece of advice you can give to young athletes about the importance of fueling their bodies? 
Take your nutrition seriously. It is your source of energy, recovery, and fuel. And it promotes a strong immune system and long term health. 

Q2: Do you have a favorite snack that helps to keep your energy up?
I like to make smoothies as an afternoon snack. It allows me to ingest several important nutrients and helps me keep my weight and energy up throughout the season. I’ve been trying to get more vegetable servings into my diet so I add spinach to my smoothies and I don't even taste it. 

Q3: Staying hydrated is important, what are some strategies you use to keep up with your daily hydration?
I  made it a routine to have a glass of water first thing every morning. I also carry a bottle of water with me throughout the day to sip on. Urine color is a great indicator of hydration levels. If my urine is clear or light yellow I’m hydrated. If it starts to get a darker yellow I know I need to drink more water.

Q4: Can you give players a sneak peak into your training day food routine?
Ideal meal day example: 
Breakfast: Grass feed organic eggs with sauteed spinach, avocado with sea salt, fresh fruit, water and coffee with MCT oil
Post workout lunch: Organic chicken thighs, broccoli, quinoa, water
Dinner: Wild Alaska salmon, sweet potato, asparagus, kombucha tea 

Snacks I like to mix in thought the day: nuts, kefir, smoothie, greek yogurt, fresh berries, avocado, sliced apple with almond butter

I try to always get organic/grass fed/wild/local foods to insure I get the omega three fatty acids from a grass fed diet and stay away from GMO’s and pesticides. I cook with coconut oil or olive oil to get healthy saturated fats. Healthy fats are a good energy source throughout a long season. I drink kefir and kombucha(probiotics) for gut health to keep my immune system strong. And fresh berries for a good source of carbohydrates and fiber. I try to stay away from processed foods. 

Q5: What is one healthy food that you can't believe you like now?
Kale. I saw a recipe for sautéed kale with fresh garlic and coconut oil so I gave it a try. Its now one of my favorite veggies to mix in with dinner. I cook it so it has a little crunch to it and throw some sea salt on top at the end. 

Q & A with Chris Downey

This Q & A features in the insight of Chris Downey, the Director of Sports Medicine at Binghamton University. 

Chris Downey, MS, ATC Director of Sports Medicine at Binghamton University     Downey began his tenure at Binghamton on August 3, 2015 and oversees BU’s entire athletic training program, which includes eight full-time staff members and more than a dozen student-trainers.

Chris Downey, MS, ATC
Director of Sports Medicine at Binghamton University  

Downey began his tenure at Binghamton on August 3, 2015 and oversees BU’s entire athletic training program, which includes eight full-time staff members and more than a dozen student-trainers.

Q: In your work with college athletes, what is one nutrition mistake you see commonly made? And one nutrition strength you see commonly among athletes?

Mistakes: Unfortunately, I see many nutrition mistakes with college student-athletes (poor hydration, not enough calories consumed, improper protein intake, etc.).

In my opinion, there is two reasons for this: 1. Student-athletes truly are not familiar with what they should be consuming on a daily basis and before/after physical activity. 2. They have very demanding schedules that makes it difficult for them to schedule proper fueling. This is why many institutions have developed nutrition training tables and refueling stations.

Strengths - I think student-athletes are eager/receptive to learn about how proper nutrition habits can benefit them and once they are instructed properly they will make appropriate changes.

Q: Have you observed that well-fueled athletes meet their training goals or recover quicker? 

Absolutely. It is obvious to me when student-athletes are well-fueled versus not. Their training goals, recovery, and rehabilitation is always improved when fueled properly. 

What are the top areas related to nutrition that you think athletes need to focus on? 
In a general sense, I would like student-athletes to focus on hydration and caloric intake (not empty calories). 

What is a nutrition tip you can share with coaches or trainers should routinely reminder or talk to their players about?
My biggest tip is to create resources for your student-athletes; such as, a registered dietitian or nutritionist they can meet with, water bottles for them to hydrate with, and refueling stations. It is a lot more likely for your student-athletes to make proper nutrition choices if they have resources available for them to utilize.  

Q & A with Jonathan Levitt

Are you an athlete on the go? Check out this Q & A with great tips from avid runner and traveler Jonathan Levitt. 

Jonathan is an avid runner and loves to travel. He works at InsideTracker, with endurance and professional athletes. 

Jonathan is an avid runner and loves to travel. He works at InsideTracker, with endurance and professional athletes. 

Q: What is one aspect of your nutrition routine that you have found to directly benefit your training/running?

A: I personalize my nutrition by blood analysis with InsideTracker, so I know exactly what my body needs based on how I’m training and eating. My energy level is way higher and I’m able to tolerate higher volume much better than in the past.

Q: What is your favorite snack and why?

A: A handful of nuts or piece of dark chocolate. Tasty and filling!

Q: Do you eat differently on training days versus rest days? If so, why?

A: Yes! I add some more carbohydrates and calories in general on hard days, and more iron rich foods on rest/easy days to help with iron absorption as a runner. 

Q: When you are traveling, what is one tip you can share with on-the-go athletes to stick with their eating routine?

A: BRING SNACKS! I was recently stopped by TSA and had my bags searched ahead of a two week trip to the west coast. “Do they not have food where you’re going?” they asked, because I was carrying so much with me. While the question was definitely a sarcastic one, I always plan as if there won’t be food where I’m going, and bring enough so that if I’m out and about for a few days, I won’t get hangry.

Q: If you could share on thing related to sports nutrition that all athletes should start focusing on today, what would that be?

A: Eat more. While not true for everyone, most of us are under-fueling for the amount of training we’re putting in. Every body is unique. Personalize your nutrition just like you personalize your training. Dietitians (and InsideTracker) are great resources! 

Q & A with Rob Baxter, Owner of BX Training

Rob Baxter is owner of  BX Training  in Binghamton, NY. 

Rob Baxter is owner of BX Training in Binghamton, NY. 

Q: In your experience in training athletes, what is one nutrition mistake you see commonly made?

A: Something I commonly see with many athletes I work with is simple lack of discipline in regard to eating for performance. Maintaining the consistency required to properly fuel their body can be a significant challenge for most. 

Excuses are commonplace and must be eliminated to be successful. Basic honest self analysis works best. I often challenge my athletes to ask themselves one simple question, “do my habits reflect my goals?” 

Eating well balanced, planned out meals (preferably at pre determined meal times) each day is crucial to not only feeling & playing strong but also a key component to staying healthy throughout a long season. 

Q: Have you observed that well-fueled athletes meet their training goals quicker? Can you share any examples?

A: Well-fueled athletes are more likely to not only meet their training goals quicker, but also possess the ability to maintain a higher level of performance more consistently. Their bodies also hold up throughout the grind and bounce back quicker for the following practice/game.. as soon as one is over, the intelligent athlete will begin to prepare his body for the next session thru treatment, nutrition & rest. 

A few years ago, I trained Kevin Jones following his senior year at West Virginia in preparation for the NBA Draft process. This is a high pressured process where an athlete will travel from city to city working out for various NBA Organizations. Within a 30 day period, Kevin probably went to 20 different teams and performing his best at each workout was obviously very important. In preparation for such a grueling physical, mental and emotional run we did our best to integrate skill work, strength work, nutrition, hydration and recovery into our overall 60 day training program with Kevin. His hard work, dedication & discipline paid off later that year as he made the Cleveland Cavaliers as an undrafted rookie. Kevin’s desire to be great and willingness to put in the work to do so is the reason he is now a professional, while also being remembered as one of the most productive players in West Virginia and Big East history. 

Q: If you could give athletes one thing to focus on with nutrition, what would it be?

A: A few years ago I was hired to train the Monmouth University Men’s basketball team for the entire Spring semester in preparation for a summer trip to China where they would visit the country and compete against some of their top professional teams. 

The number one thing I tried to accomplish aside from the physical aspect of the program was to instill proper hydration techniques along with post workout recovery shake and meal consumption. Each player was given a precise plan of what was required of them to intake on a daily basis as well as the most important time to eat/drink etc.  We were significantly challenging these young men physically.. we needed them to give their very best each day in order to get the desired results.. therefore it was crucial that each of them was getting appropriate nutrition, hydration and rest. 

Q: What is a tip you can share with parents of youth athletes related to food? 

A: My advice to parents of young athletes is to hire a registered dietitian to assess your son/daughter and provide an “Eat to WIN” plan of attack. This will insure their needs are being met daily in regard to nutrition. There are so many factors to be considered such as age, gender, body composition, training/tournament frequency, overall weight loss/weight gain goals, etc etc. Having a professionally designed plan to meet your child’s individual nutritional needs as an athlete can be the difference not only in performance, but more importantly with general health and wellness. 


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The BX Training Philosophy: As a training organization, our primary goal is to provide athletes with the most complete and professional program for personal and performance enhancement. We train each individual person to become the best possible athlete that they are capable of becoming. For more on BX Training or to contact Rob visit: http://www.bxplayer.com/index.html

Q & A with Mike Sdao

Mike Sdao Professional defenseman currently with the Rapid City Rush (ECHL) and formerly with the Binghamton Senators (AHL). 

Mike Sdao Professional defenseman currently with the Rapid City Rush (ECHL) and formerly with the Binghamton Senators (AHL). 

Q: What is the biggest challenge around food & nutrition for you as an athlete?

Finding healthy food to eat on the road. 

Grab quick on the go snack ideas with this Fuel 2 Win handout, click here to download it. 

Q: What is one (or more) of your favorite go-to snacks to keep your energy levels up?

Simple carb like air popped popcorn or pretzels. 

Q: What is your favorite grain and how do you like to have it (e.g. quinoa, brown rice pasta, etc.)?
Rice, I like to have it on game days because it is easy and I feel like it gives me energy without feeling heavy like pasta or some other carbs.


Q: If you could give a nutrition tip to another athlete what would it be?
It can make a big difference not only in your performance but in your consistency. 


Q: Do you have a favorite smoothie combination that you enjoy?
I've actually moved onto juicing rather than smoothies just because I feel like I sometimes put on weight when I have smoothies often.